What's New?

January 5, 2005
To read the archives, on the Internet, please click here.

In This Issue: Happenings Site News Meetings Chat Info

Young Sam has debuted on the Discovery Health show, "Mystery Diagnosis". There are several future airings...
Against all odds: The story of a miracle
Insmed Completes New Drug Application -NDA- for SomatoKine for the Treatment of Growth Hormone Insensitivity Syndrome.
Boost Brainpower and Heart Health with Antioxidants from Nature's Little Blue Pill
Clinical Trials
Upcoming Meetings in Florida and San Diego; Local Meetings
Three new bios.
Read all about them below.


Next Online Newsletter will be Wednesday, January 12
read archived issues here »
News!
Discovery Health aired Sam's show, "Mystery Diagnosis", Monday, November 15, 10PM EST. Upcoming viewings will be 1/10/05, 1/13/05, 1/16/05. This show was be the first in a series called Diseases Doctors Miss. Every year, millions of Americans fall prey to ailments that go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Medical professionals struggle to understand their baffling conditions. More info here »

Meri found this important article for us...

http://www.selmatimesjournal.com/articles/2005/01/02/news/local/news505.txt Against all odds: The story of a miracle

By John Gullion
Friday, December 31, 2004 3:55 PM CST
Times-Journal Managing Editor

Everyone that knows her will say Kaitlyn Elizabeth Burbage is a miracle baby. In a way that's true because all babies are miracles, even the ones whose parents don't know it.

But what separates 8-month old Kaitlyn from the pack, aside from the beautiful, big blue eyes that light up her face when she smiles, is that she has a miracle mommy.

Kaitlyn's mommy, Kelli Burbage is living a miracle. The doctors say she shouldn't have been able to get pregnant. The doctors said if she did manage to get pregnant, her body would reject the baby. The doctor who saved her life said if the tumor that consumed her pituitary gland had lasted much longer, Kelli Burbage would be dead right now.

Burbage, who suffers from a condition known as Cushing's Disease, is a living example that sometimes-even doctors are as human as the rest of us.

"Doctors are not always the only physicians people can have," said Burbage, a Selma native. "When doctors say impossible, God says possible."

Kaitlyn's grandmother, Joyce Smith, puts it in other terms.

"She's just precious," Smith said. "She just wasn't meant to be but we have her and she's blessed."

Kaitlyn was born April 13, a healthy 8-pounds and 3-ounces, in a hospital room full of family friends and one Mississippi medical student who stayed hours after her shift with her next shift approaching fast, just so she could watch the woman without a pituitary gland give birth.

But that's the end of the story, at least for now. This isn't the story of what happened after little Kaitlyn came into this world, it's the story of how she came into this world at all.

When Kelli Burbage met her future husband Gene, she was 5-foot-7 and 118 pounds, over the next year and a half she gained 150 pounds.

"All of a sudden she put on excess weight, it really lowered her self esteem," Smith said. "She has always been an outgoing person. She just kind of withdrew. She tried to get help and tried diets and nothing helped."

Kelli knew something was wrong, however the four doctors she went to see over the next two years couldn't find it.

"Every doctor said 'you're obese and inactive, your metabolism has slowed down," Kelli said, the anger still bristling in her voice.

Though she thought differently, the doctors made Kelli doubt herself, after all she did work 9-to-5 at a desk job and then go to law school at night. Maybe it was her sedentary lifestyle.

Her mother believed the doctors as well, but she suspected there was more going on than the doctors said.

"I'd tell her to go to the doctor and she'd go and they'd chalk it up to you each too much," Smith said. "I felt like something was wrong."

It took a trip to the plastic surgeon, to get some moles removed, for Kelli to find the truth.

"He saved her life," Smith said.

The plastic surgeon, Dr. Louis Pernia, saw the skin tags under her arm, the stretch marks, found the knot at the base of her neck, noticed the hair falling out and found the hump growing in the middle of her back.

He started asking questions, which Kelli's 18-year-old sister Katie started answering.

"Have you always been big?"

"No, she was tall and thin."

"Have you been having mood swings?"

"Lord, yes."

"Have your eating habits changed?"

"No, she eats the same as she always has, even less," Katie replied.

Within 30 minutes, Kelli found herself getting a CAT scan to check for a possible cranium tumor.

Somehow she stayed outwardly calm, but "of course, I had freaked out on the inside," she said.

She had been diagnosed with Cushing's Disease.

According to the Cushing's Web site www.niddk.nih.gov/health/endo/pubs/cushings/cushings.htm, Cushing's occurs when the body's tissues are exposed to excessive levels of cortisol for long periods of time.

According to the site, Cortisol performs vital tasks in the body. It helps maintain blood pressure and cardiovascular function, reduces the immune system's inflammatory response, balances the effects of insulin in breaking down sugar for energy, and regulates the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. One of cortisol's most important jobs is to help the body respond to stress.

The CAT scan showed nothing, but after two more MRI's they found a tumor attached to her pituitary gland.

"(The tumor) going to come out or you're going to die," Kelli's neurosurgeon, Dr. Richard Morawetz, told her.

"I remember when I told my mom over the phone that the doctor had called and told me that they'd found the tumor on the MRI, she started to cry, and I said, 'Oh mom, it's just a tomah,' like Arnold Schwarzenegger in Kindergarten Cop," Kelli said. "And she said, 'I don't know how you can be laughing about this.' I said, 'Momma, what have you and Daddy always taught us? That God will not give us more than we can handle, right? And besides, I can laugh or I can cry, and crying just messes up your makeup.'"

From the MRI, the doctors couldn't see where the tumor started and stopped, Morawetz told Kelly and her family that if he couldn't find it, he'd have to take the tumor and the entire gland.

"If I take the whole thing you're going to be on hormone therapy the rest of your life and there's no way you can have children," Morawetz told her.

The pituitary gland is sometimes called the "master" gland of the endocrine system, because it controls the functions of the other endocrine glands. The pituitary gland is no larger than a pea, and is located at the base of the brain.

The Sunday before the surgery, Kelli and her husband Gene, were called to come to their church early for a special prayer session at Central Church of Christ in Tuscaloosa.

The day of the surgery came and Kelli made it through.

As Morawetz told them the good news, he also delivered the bad.

"He said 'I had to take it all,'" Burbage said. "My parents knew what that meant. He said 'We're lucky we caught it when we did, she would have been gone in a year.'"

"Our hearts dropped, but at least she was going to be living," Smith said.

Doctors removed Burbage's pituitary gland at the stalk and told Kelli that within 24 hours her hormone levels would bottom out and she would spend the rest of her life taking medications to replace them.

Her hormone levels never dropped. To this day, Kelli hasn't had to start taking the meds.

"They cannot figure out why my hormones never bottomed out," Burbage said. "Dr. Elizabeth Innis (who works with Morawetz) she said something else has to be wrong."

But the neurosurgeons checked and couldn't find anything else wrong.

"I'm the case they've been talking about," Kelli said.

Still, the doctors said Kelli would not be able to get pregnant.

"If you did get pregnant your body would not be able to handle it and you'd lose it, we had decided we would just adopt," she said. "When I got pregnant, (the doctors) really freaked out."

They weren't the only ones. Kelli's husband Gene wept. Her family couldn't believe it.

"She'd call and say the adoption agency doesn't have a baby yet and I'd say when the time's right it will happen," Smith said. "She said in April you're going to be grandparents. We thought it was the adoption. She said 'we're pregnant' and I said 'what?'"

Fast-forward about nine months and little Kaitlyn entered the world to the relief of her family and the astonishment of the medical community.

Kelli has joined a Cushing's support group online, there are only three other cases in Alabama, as far as she knows. And she is working to battle the weight, so far she has lost 46 pounds.

"I still avoid seeing old friends, going to weddings, reunions because they all remember the 118-pound me," she said. "Nobody would recognize me now."

She continues to be astounded by the love and loyalty of her husband who has stuck by her side.

"He has been my rock. He has held my hand and been there with me and prayed with me through all of this," she said. "I couldn't have done it without him."

Though they still hope to adopt, the Burbage's little family is content to watch Kaitlyn as she grows into a young lady.

"I feel like she knows things that we don't know," Kelli said. "One of the men at church told me 'I believe babies can see angels.' I think god's missing an angel, he sent one down to me."

Kaitlyn's mommy, Kelli Burbage is living a miracle. The doctors say she shouldn't have been able to get pregnant. The doctors said if she did manage to get pregnant, her body would reject the baby. The doctor who saved her life said if the tumor that consumed her pituitary gland had lasted much longer, Kelli Burbage would be dead right now.

Burbage, who suffers from a condition known as Cushing's Disease, is a living example that sometimes-even doctors are as human as the rest of us.

"Doctors are not always the only physicians people can have," said Burbage, a Selma native. "When doctors say impossible, God says possible."

Kaitlyn's grandmother, Joyce Smith, puts it in other terms.

"She's just precious," Smith said. "She just wasn't meant to be but we have her and she's blessed."

Kaitlyn was born April 13, a healthy 8-pounds and 3-ounces, in a hospital room full of family friends and one Mississippi medical student who stayed hours after her shift with her next shift approaching fast, just so she could watch the woman without a pituitary gland give birth.

But that's the end of the story, at least for now. This isn't the story of what happened after little Kaitlyn came into this world, it's the story of how she came into this world at all.

When Kelli Burbage met her future husband Gene, she was 5-foot-7 and 118 pounds, over the next year and a half she gained 150 pounds.

"All of a sudden she put on excess weight, it really lowered her self esteem," Smith said. "She has always been an outgoing person. She just kind of withdrew. She tried to get help and tried diets and nothing helped."

Kelli knew something was wrong, however, the four doctors she went to see over the next two years couldn't find it.

"Every doctor said 'you're obese and inactive, your metabolism has slowed down," Kelli said, the anger still bristling in her voice.

Though she thought differently, the doctors made Kelli doubt herself, after all she did work 9-to-5 at a desk job and then go to law school at night. Maybe it was her sedentary lifestyle.

Her mother believed the doctors as well, but she suspected there was more going on than the doctors said.

"I'd tell her to go to the doctor and she'd go and they'd chalk it up to you each too much," Smith said. "I felt like something was wrong."

It took a trip to the plastic surgeon, to get some moles removed, for Kelli to find the truth.

"He saved her life," Smith said.

The plastic surgeon, Dr. Louis Pernia, saw the skin tags under her arm, the stretch marks, found the knot at the base of her neck, noticed the hair falling out and found the hump growing in the middle of her back.

He started asking questions, which Kelli's 18-year-old sister Katie started answering.

"Have you always been big?"

"No, she was tall and thin."

"Have you been having mood swings?"

"Lord, yes."

"Have your eating habits changed?"

"No, she eats the same as she always has, even less," Katie replied.

Within 30 minutes, Kelli found herself getting a CAT scan to check for a possible cranium tumor.

Somehow she stayed outwardly calm, but "of course, I had freaked out on the inside," she said.

She had been diagnosed with Cushing's Disease.

According to the Cushing's Web site www.niddk.nih.gov/health/endo/pubs/cushings/cushings.htm, Cushing's occurs when the body's tissues are exposed to excessive levels of cortisol for long periods of time.

According to the site, Cortisol performs vital tasks in the body. It helps maintain blood pressure and cardiovascular function, reduces the immune system's inflammatory response, balances the effects of insulin in breaking down sugar for energy, and regulates the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. One of cortisol's most important jobs is to help the body respond to stress.

The CAT scan showed nothing, but after two more MRI's they found a tumor attached to her pituitary gland.

"(The tumor's) going to come out or you're going to die," Kelli's neurosurgeon, Dr. Richard Morawetz, told her.

"I remember when I told my mom over the phone that the doctor had called and told me that they'd found the tumor on the MRI, she started to cry, and I said, 'Oh mom, it's just a 'tomah,' like Arnold Schwarzenegger in Kindergarten Cop," Kelli said. "And she said, 'I don't know how you can be laughing about this.' I said, 'Momma, what have you and Daddy always taught us? That God will not give us more than we can handle, right? And besides, I can laugh or I can cry, and crying just messes up your makeup.'"

From the MRI, the doctors couldn't see where the tumor started and stopped, Morawetz told Kelly and her family that if he couldn't find it, he'd have to take the tumor and the entire gland.

"If I take the whole thing you're going to be on hormone therapy the rest of your life and there's no way you can have children," Morawetz told her.

The pituitary gland is sometimes called the "master" gland of the endocrine system, because it controls the functions of the other endocrine glands. The pituitary gland is no larger than a pea, and is located at the base of the brain.

The Sunday before the surgery, Kelli and her husband Gene, were called to come to their church early for a special prayer session at Central Church of Christ in Tuscaloosa.

The day of the surgery came and Kelli made it through.

As Morawetz told them the good news, he also delivered the bad.

"He said 'I had to take it all,'" Burbage said. "My parents knew what that meant. He said 'We're lucky we caught it when we did, she would have been gone in a year.'"

"Our hearts dropped, but at least she was going to be living," Smith said.

Doctors removed Burbage's pituitary gland at the stalk and told Kelli that within 24 hours her hormone levels would bottom out and she would spend the rest of her life taking medications to replace them.

Her hormone levels never dropped. To this day, Kelli hasn't had to start taking the meds.

"They cannot figure out why my hormones never bottomed out," Burbage said. "Dr. Elizabeth Innis (who works with Morawetz) she said something else has to be wrong."

But the neurosurgeons checked and couldn't find anything else wrong.

"I'm the case they've been talking about," Kelli said.

Still, the doctors said Kelli would not be able to get pregnant.

"If you did get pregnant your body would not be able to handle it and you'd lose it, we had decided we would just adopt," she said. "When I got pregnant, (the doctors) really freaked out."

They weren't the only ones. Kelli's husband Gene wept. Her family couldn't believe it.

"She'd call and say the adoption agency doesn't have a baby yet and I'd say when the time's right it will happen," Smith said. "She said in April you're going to be grandparents. We thought it was the adoption. She said 'we're pregnant' and I said 'what?'"

Fast-forward about nine months and little Kaitlyn entered the world to the relief of her family and the astonishment of the medical community.

Kelli has joined a Cushing's support group online, there are only three other cases in Alabama, as far as she knows. And she is working to battle the weight, so far she has lost 46 pounds.

"I still avoid seeing old friends, going to weddings, reunions because they all remember the 118-pound me," she said. "Nobody would recognize me now."

She continues to be astounded by the love and loyalty of her husband who has stuck by her side.

"He has been my rock. He has held my hand and been there with me and prayed with me through all of this," she said. "I couldn't have done it without him."

Though they still hope to adopt, the Burbage's little family is content to watch Kaitlyn as she grows into a young lady.

"I feel like she knows things that we don't know," Kelli said. "One of the men at church told me 'I believe babies can see angels.' I think god's missing an angel, he sent one down to me."




Insmed Completes New Drug Application -NDA- for SomatoKine for the Treatment of Growth Hormone Insensitivity Syndrome;
Conference Call Scheduled for 11:00 am January 5, 2005

RICHMOND, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)----Insmed Incorporated (Nasdaq:INSM) announced that it has completed the New Drug Application (NDA) to seek regulatory approval of SomatoKine(R) (Mecasermin rinfabate) for the treatment of growth hormone insensitivity syndrome. The Company will submit the NDA before market open on Monday, January 3, 2005.

"The completion of the NDA for SomatoKine represents a great achievement for the Company. An NDA is a huge undertaking for a small company like Insmed and we have made every effort to ensure we have a submission of the highest quality. This important milestone is evidence of our continuing commitment to develop medicines for patients with unmet medical needs," said Geoffrey Allan, Ph.D., President and CEO of Insmed Incorporated.

Conference Call

Insmed will host a conference call on Wednesday, January 5, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time (10:00 a.m. Central Time) to provide an update on recent corporate events and planned activities for 2005. To participate in the conference call dial 800-479-9001(domestic) or 719-457-2618 (international). The call will be webcast live through Insmed's corporate website: www.insmed.com.

A telephonic replay of the call will be available for one week at 888-203-1112 (domestic) or 719-457-0820 (international), passcode: 238426. A web replay of the call will be available through the corporate website beginning at 1:00 p.m.

More on SomatoKine(R)

Insmed's SomatoKine(R) is a proprietary delivery composition of insulin- like growth factor-I (IGF-I). The novel compound is administered as a subcutaneous injection, which can restore IGF levels to physiological relevant levels. On July 20, Insmed provided the results from a six-month data analysis of the pivotal Phase III GHIS clinical trial showing a statistically significant increase (p<0.0001) in height velocity in children receiving SomatoKine(R) as a once-daily injection. In diabetic subjects, administration of SomatoKine(R) demonstrated a significant improvement in blood sugar control and a significant reduction in daily insulin use. Following severe burn injury, in both children and adults, administration of SomatoKine(R) demonstrated a significant improvement in muscle protein synthesis and a significant reduction in the inflammatory response associated with the trauma. In recovery from hip fractures, administration of SomatoKine(R) has demonstrated a significant improvement in functional recovery and bone mineral density.

About Insmed

Insmed is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of drug candidates for the treatment of metabolic diseases and endocrine disorders with unmet medical needs. For more information, please visit www.insmed.com.

Statements included within this press release, which are not historical in nature, may constitute forward-looking statements for purposes of the safe harbor provided by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements in this press release include, but are not limited to, statements regarding clinical trials and goals, our regulatory and business strategies and growth opportunities for existing or proposed products. Such forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including risks that product candidates may fail in the clinic or may not be successfully marketed or manufactured, the company may lack financial resources to complete development of product candidates, the FDA may interpret the results of our studies differently than we have, competing products may be more successful, demand for new pharmaceutical products may decrease, the biopharmaceutical industry may experience negative market trends and other risks detailed from time to time in the company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. As a result of these and other risks and uncertainties, actual results may differ materially from those described in this press release. For further information with respect to factors that could cause actual results to differ from expectations, reference is made to reports filed by the Company with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The forward-looking statements made in this release are made only as of the date hereof and Insmed disclaims any intention or responsibility for updating predictions or financial guidance contained in this release.

Insmed Incorporated Investor Relations: Baxter Phillips, III, 804-565-3041 Fax: 804-565-3510 bphillips@insmed.com
12/31/2004 09:22 ET



Boost Brainpower and Heart Health with Antioxidants from Nature's Little Blue Pill

MILBRIDGE, Maine, Jan. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- If you could find an "all-in-one" pill for staving off Alzheimer's Disease, lowering cholesterol and fighting cancer, wouldn't you want to order a bulk supply now? Especially if that pill was also available in chewable or liquid form, without a prescription, free of side effects (except addiction to its sweet taste), and delicious?

That magic "little blue pill" already exists in the form of wild blueberries, which are receiving increasing attention for empowering consumers toward better health-naturally. In response, Wyman's -- the United States' oldest and largest grower of wild blueberries -- has made its Fresh Frozen Wild Blueberries and Wild Blueberry Juice newly available nationwide -- through major grocery stores, price clubs and natural food stores.

"The link between wild blueberries and disease prevention is so compelling that I advise my patients to eat them every day," said Daniel Nadeau, M.D., medical director of the HealthReach Diabetes, Endocrine & Nutrition Center, Hampton, NH and co-author of The Color Code: A Revolutionary Eating Plan for Optimum Health. "Adding wild blueberries to the diet today is an easy and powerful step toward preventing tomorrow's Alzheimer's Disease, heart disease and cancer."

Research Supports Disease-Fighting Power

In 2004, researchers revealed a number of new reasons to call wild blueberries "nature's wonder drug." A USDA study in The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry analyzed more than 100 fruits, vegetables, spices and nuts, ranking wild blueberries the number one antioxidant fruit. The study also uncovered an intriguing finding-that wild blueberries (the smaller, darker variety) have 48% more antioxidants than cultivated blueberries (the larger and lighter-colored berries). Antioxidants help protect the body from deterioration due to free-radical activity -- putting up an additional barrier against major diseases such as cancer and heart disease.

This summer, the buzz about blueberries echoed through the halls of the American Chemical Society's national meeting in Philadelphia. USDA research unveiled there showed that pterostilbene, which is naturally present in blueberries, may also fight cholesterol build-up. In the lab, the compound worked like ciprofibrate, a drug prescribed outside the U.S. to keep cholesterol levels low. And that's not all ...

In recent years, published studies singled out blueberries for their potential to combat a host of age-related neurological and cardiovascular conditions, including Alzheimer's Disease. In fact, a USDA animal study conducted by Tufts University researcher James A. Joseph, Ph.D., showed that subjects on a two-month diet supplemented with blueberries demonstrated improved memory and motor skills (such as balance and coordination).

Gaining the Most from Nature's "Little Blue Pill"

For those looking for their own wild blueberry prescription, Wyman's is putting its products within easy reach. Its Fresh Frozen Wild Blueberries are available through major supermarket chains, price clubs, and natural food stores. So is Wyman's new Wild Blueberry Juice. Each eight-ounce serving of the juice, available in bottles and snack packs, provides the same amount of disease-fighting antioxidants as a half-cup of wild blueberries, or one FDA- approved serving of fruit.

Wild Blueberries -- A Jasper Wyman & Son Legacy

Jasper Wyman & Son is the largest US Wild Blueberry grower and processor, with a processing facility in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Wyman's line of branded Wild Blueberry products includes Wyman's Wild Blueberry Juice, canned blueberries, and Wyman's Fresh Frozen Blueberries. Founded in 1874 by entrepreneur Jasper Wyman, the company is still privately owned by the Wyman family. Headquartered in Milbridge, Maine, the company manages more than 7,000 acres of Wild Blueberries. Jasper Wyman & Son can be found on the Web at http://www.wymans.com.




Centerwatch Trial Notification Service

1) Do you suffer from Fibromyalgia?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Rochester, NY (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66243.html)

2) Cholesterol Research Study. This study is being conducted in:

    - Mogadore, OH (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66570.html)

3) Fibromyalgia Research Study. This study is being conducted in:

    - Mogadore, OH (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66569.html)

4) Clinical Research Opportunities for Cholesterol. This study is being
conducted in:

    - Tacoma, WA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66580.html)

5) Double-Blind treatment of outpatients with Dysthymic Disorder with Wellbutrin
XL.. This study is being conducted in:

    - New York, NY (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66216.html)

6) Hot Flashes Research Study. This study is being conducted in:

    - Tacoma, WA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66581.html)

7) Struggling With Your Weight?  Want to do Something About It?. This study is
being conducted in:

    - Boston, MA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66338.html)

8) Cerebral Metabolic Correlates of Treatment Response in Social Anxiety
Disorder. This study is being conducted in:

    - Boston, MA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66368.html)

9) Obesity, Nutrition and Prevention of Diabetes and Heart Disease. This study
is being conducted in:

    - Boston, MA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66067.html)

10) Are you struggling with your weight?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Boston, MA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66828.html)

11) Have you been feeling down, had loss of energy, and/or changes in your sleep
or appetite?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Belmont, MA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66256.html)

12) Planning to stop use of your antidepressant?. This study is being conducted
in:

    - Belmont, MA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66257.html)

13) We are looking for subjects to participate in a research study for Knee Pain
Due To Arthritis.. This study is being conducted in:

    - Ann Arbor, MI (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66060.html)

14) Menopause:  Are your symptoms out of control?. This study is being conducted
in:

    - Philadelphia, PA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66149.html)

15) Depressed and Sexually Active?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Charlottesville, VA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu65862.html)

16) Cholesterol Research Study. This study is being conducted in:

    - Santa Rosa, CA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66577.html)

17) Are you concerned about Osteoporosis?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Anaheim, CA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66058.html)

18) Are you suffering from Osteoporosis?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Charlottesville, VA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66565.html)

19) Are your waistline and blood pressure on the rise?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Eugene, OR (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66922.html)

20) We are looking for women to participate in a research study for the treatment of hot flashes due to menopause. The investigational medication is a hormone gel applied to the arm once daily.. This study is being conducted in:

    - Ann Arbor, MI (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66848.html)

21) Omega 3 Fatty-Acid/ Depression Study. This study is being conducted in:

    - Boston, MA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66846.html)

22) Do your hot flashes cause you to sweat?. This study is being conducted in:

    - Philadelphia, PA (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66990.html)

23) Cholesterol Research Study. This study is being conducted in:

    - Cincinnati, OH (http://www.centerwatch.com/patient/studies/stu66863.html)

Additional educational resources that may be of interest to you:
Informed Consent: A Guide to the Risks and Benefits of Volunteering for Clinical Trials. http://www.centerwatch.com/bookstore/pubs_cons_infconsent.html

Volunteering for a Clinical Trial, a brief educational pamphlet. If you would
like to order this pamphlet click here: http://www.centerwatch.com/bookstore/pubs_cons_brochureform.html



We welcome your articles, letters to the editor, bios and Cushing's information. Submit a Story or Article to either the snailmail CUSH Newsletter or to an upcoming email newsletter at http://www.cushings-help.com/newsletter_story.htm

Newest Bios:
To add or edit your bio, please click here »
Nancy M Nancy M had pituitary surgery in May, 2004. Dewey, Arizona
Sam M Sam M's Wife has Cushing's. Pituitary and both Adrenal Glands, one has been removed. Bipolar Disorders Spending Sprees, Writing Bad Checks, stealing money, Dramatic Mood Swings, Feelings hurt easily, 3 Family Court cases in 12 years for verbal abuse, with seperations. 3 Children with same problem of Cushing's. Ferndale, New York
Sherry C Sherry C is not yet diagnosed Oregon


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Lynne Clemens, Secretary of CUSH Org is be the person responsible for the creation of this register. If you have any questions you may contact her at lynnecush@comcast.net. You do not have to be a member of CUSH to fill out this questionnaire, as long as you are a Cushing’s patient. We do not believe that the world has an accurate accounting of Cushing’s patients. The only way to authenticate accuracy is with actual numbers. Your help will be appreciated. Thank you."

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... all year round.

iGive.com allows online stores to donate a percentage of their profit to running these Cushing's Support sites (the message boards at http://boards.cushings-interactive.com/invboard/, http://www.cushings-help.com, http://www.CUSH.org, http://www.cushings-support.com and http://www.cushingsonline.com) at no cost to you. So far, members have raised $321.58, and it hasn't cost them a cent.

See the list of over 470 participating merchants » When you register between now and the end of the year at http://www.iGive.com/cushings, you will earn an additional $5 for these Cushing's Support sites.


Thank you so much for your support.


CUSH can always use funds to help us all, by spreading the word and helping others. What can *you* do to help CUSH?


Upcoming Conventions, Meetings and Seminars:

January 28, 2005, Pituitary Update Conference For Patients And Physicians. More info here.

June 4-7, 2005, ENDO 2005, San Diego. Mainly for physicians, but patients may attend. More info here.

More upcoming local meetings are listed here »

Sign up for notification of local meetings. You need not be a CUSH member to participate.

Online Chats:
Please join us in the Chat Room TONIGHT at 9 PM Eastern.

The new chatroom is available through http://www.cushings-help.com/chatroom.htm. Since this is our own room, you won't need to go into another area after first logging in. You'll be right there!

The very first time you go in, you will have to register for this chat. Although you may use your user name and password from the message boards, you will still need to register those before being allowed into the room.

This room is always open, and has convenient links so that you can get needed information while you're chatting.

I hope to see you tonight!


~~~~~~~~~~~

Cushing's Help and Support at http://www.cushings-help.com
Cushing's Message Boards at http://boards.cushings-interactive.com/invboard/
Subscribe and Unsubscribe: Cushing's Newsletters and Chat Reminders http://www.cushings-help.com/aim.htm#reminder

 

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E-mail: CushingsSupport@aol.com
Toll-Free: (877) 825-0128

On the Web: Cushing's Help Website
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CUSH: Cushing's Understanding, Support and Help
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